Science X Newsletter Week 34

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 34:

Mathematical model predicts best way to build muscle

Researchers have developed a mathematical model that can predict the optimum exercise regimen for building muscle.

LED streetlights contribute to insect population declines: study

Streetlights—particularly those that use white light-emitting diodes (LEDs)—not only disrupt insect behavior but are also a culprit behind their declining numbers, a new study carried out in southern England showed Wednesday.

Secrets of COVID-19 transmission revealed in turbulent puffs

Turbulence is everywhere—in the movement of the wind, the ocean waves and even magnetic fields in space. It can also be seen in more transient phenomena, like smoke billowing from a chimney, or a cough.

Possible new antivirals against COVID-19, herpes

In addition to antibodies and white blood cells, the immune system deploys peptides to fight viruses and other pathogens. Synthetic peptides could reinforce this defense but don't last long in the body, so researchers are developing stable peptide mimics. Today, scientists report success in using mimics known as peptoids to treat animals with herpes virus infections. These small synthetic molecules could one day cure or prevent many kinds of infections, including COVID-19.

World-first detector designed by dark matter researchers records rare events

A ground-breaking detector that aims to use quartz to capture high frequency gravitational waves has been built by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Dark Matter Particle Physics (CDM) and the University of Western Australia.

Manned Mars mission viable if it doesn't exceed four years, concludes international research team

Sending human travelers to Mars would require scientists and engineers to overcome a range of technological and safety obstacles. One of them is the grave risk posed by particle radiation from the sun, distant stars and galaxies.

Interstellar comets like Borisov may not be all that rare

In 2019, astronomers spotted something incredible in our backyard: a rogue comet from another star system. Named Borisov, the icy snowball traveled 110,000 miles per hour and marked the first and only interstellar comet ever detected by humans.

In a first, scientists capture a 'quantum tug' between neighboring water molecules

Water is the most abundant yet least understood liquid in nature. It exhibits many strange behaviors that scientists still struggle to explain. While most liquids get denser as they get colder, water is most dense at 39 degrees Fahrenheit, just above its freezing point. This is why ice floats to the top of a drinking glass and lakes freeze from the surface down, allowing marine life to survive cold winters. Water also has an unusually high surface tension, allowing insects to walk on its surface, and a large capacity to store heat, keeping ocean temperatures stable.

Gut bacteria and flavonoid-rich foods are linked and improve blood pressure levels

Flavonoid-rich foods, including berries, apples, pears and wine, appear to have a positive effect on blood pressure levels, an association that is partially explained by characteristics of the gut microbiome, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

Largest real-world study of COVID-19 vaccine safety published

The Clalit Research Institute, in collaboration with researchers from Harvard University, analyzed one of the world's largest integrated health record databases to examine the safety of the Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162B2 vaccine against COVID-19. The study provides the largest peer-reviewed evaluation of the safety of a COVID-19 vaccine in a nationwide mass-vaccination setting. The study was conducted in Israel, an early global leader in COVID-19 vaccination rates.

New class of habitable exoplanets represent a big step forward in the search for life

A new class of exoplanet very different to our own, but which could support life, has been identified by astronomers, which could greatly accelerate the search for life outside our Solar System.

Origin of rare, healthy sugar found in stingless bee honey

The mystery of what creates the rare, healthy sugar found in stingless bee honey, has been solved by researchers at The University of Queensland, in collaboration with Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services.

Confiscated fossil turns out to be exceptional flying reptile from Brazil

A fossil acquired in a police raid has turned out to be one of the best-preserved flying reptiles ever found, according to a study published August 11, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Victor Beccari of the University of São Paulo and colleagues.

Study finds recent or current COVID-19 infection linked to increased risk of dangerous blood clots during surgery

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which dangerous blood clots form in the veins and has been described as the number one preventable cause of death in hospitalised patients.

Study unveils strain-induced quantum phase transitions in magic-angle graphene

Over the past few years, many physicists and material scientists worldwide have been investigating the properties and characteristics of magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene (MATBG). MATBG is a strongly correlated material that was first experimentally realized in 2018. This unique material hosts a diverse array of highly correlated phases, including metals, semimetals, Chern insulators, quantum anomalous hall states and, perhaps most interestingly, superconductivity.

The physics behind a water bear's lumbering gait

Plump and ponderous, tardigrades earned the nickname "water bears" when scientists first observed the 0.02-inch-long animals' distinctive lumbering gaits in the 18th century. Their dumpy plod, however, raises the question of why tardigrades evolved to walk at all.

Altered microbiome after antibiotics in early life shown to impact lifespan

A team of researchers from SAHMRI and Flinders University has found a link between the type of microbiome that repopulates the gut following antibiotics and shortened lifespan in mice.

Research finally reveals ancient, universal equation for the shape of an egg

Researchers from the University of Kent, the Research Institute for Environment Treatment and Vita-Market Ltd have discovered the universal mathematical formula that can describe any bird's egg existing in nature, a feat which has been unsuccessful until now.

A 1,000-year drought is hitting the West: Could desalination be a solution?

The United States and many other parts of the world are reeling under the impacts of severe drought. One possible solution is the desalination of seawater, but is it a silver bullet?

Ultrafast electron microscopy leads to pivotal discovery

Everyone who has ever been to the Grand Canyon can relate to having strong feelings from being close to one of nature's edges. Similarly, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that nanoparticles of gold act unusually when close to the edge of a one-atom thick sheet of carbon, called graphene. This could have big implications for the development of new sensors and quantum devices.


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🕵️ Hidden Toronto + Air show fight + Buy weed, plant a tree + Reader mail

Sunday, August 29, 2021 •  SUBSCRIBE NOW!


HIDDEN TORONTO

 

Osgoode Hall


The National Historic site known for its Neoclassical architecture is also home to the most infamous slavery case in Canadian history.

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OP-ED

 

Jet fight


The stealth fighter favoured by the Canadian government is schedule to make its debut at the Canadian international airshow next weekend.

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LETTERS


Chaos in Kabul


The writing was on the wall in Afghanistan. Plus, a call out to "freedom-loving Canadians" in reader mail. 

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LIFE

 

Cannabis and climate


Now that climate change has reached the tipping point, it's time for cannabis consumers to make environmental choices.

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CANADA ELECTION

 

O'Toole flips the script


On private health care, the Conservative party leader seems intent on playing the politics of misinformation.

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CANADA ELECTION

 

Climate shift


Protecting the air, water, soil, ecosystems and biodiversity that makes human life possible shouldn't be political, writes David Suzuki.

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COVER STORY

 

Exodus Toronto


ICYMI, in our cover story this week, Glenn Sumi reconnects with former Toronto artists and culture workers lured by jobs and better access to nature outside the province.

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CONTEST

 

Win two tickets to see OKAN & Special Guests plus dinner at Lula Lounge!


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