Science X Newsletter Week 11

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 11:

Scientists determine the origin of extra-solar object 'Oumuamua

In 2017, the first interstellar object from beyond our solar system was discovered via the Pan-STARRS astronomical observatory in Hawaii. It was named 'Oumuamua, meaning "scout" or "messenger" in Hawaiian. The object was like a comet, but with features that were just odd enough to defy classification.

Scientists stunned to discover plants beneath mile-deep Greenland ice

In 1966, US Army scientists drilled down through nearly a mile of ice in northwestern Greenland—and pulled up a fifteen-foot-long tube of dirt from the bottom. Then this frozen sediment was lost in a freezer for decades. It was accidentally rediscovered in 2017.

NASA's Juno reveals dark origins of one of Jupiter's grand light shows

New results from the Ultraviolet Spectrograph instrument on NASA's Juno mission reveal for the first time the birth of auroral dawn storms—the early morning brightening unique to Jupiter's spectacular aurorae. These immense, transient displays of light occur at both Jovian poles and had previously been observed only by ground-based and Earth-orbiting observatories, notably NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Results of this study were published March 16 in the journal AGU Advances.

Feeding cattle seaweed reduces their greenhouse gas emissions 82 percent

A bit of seaweed in cattle feed could reduce methane emissions from beef cattle as much as 82 percent, according to new findings from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The results, published today in the journal PLOS ONE, could pave the way for the sustainable production of livestock throughout the world.

Perseverance rover captures the sounds of driving on Mars

NASA's newest rover recorded audio of itself crunching over the surface of the Red Planet, adding a whole new dimension to Mars exploration.

A concept from physics called negentropy could help your life run smoother

Life is full of small decisions: Should I pick up that sock on the floor? Should I do the dishes before bed? What about fixing the leaky faucet in the bathroom?

Cosmic lens reveals faint radio galaxy

Radio telescopes are the world's most sensitive radio receivers, capable of finding extremely faint wisps of radio emission coming from objects at the farthest reaches of the universe. Recently, a team of astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to take advantage of a helping hand from nature to detect a distant galaxy that likely is the faintest radio-emitting object yet found.

New study finds slow walkers four times more likely to die from COVID-19: study

Slow walkers are almost four times more likely to die from COVID-19, and have over twice the risk of contracting a severe version of the virus, according to a team of researchers from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre led by Professor Tom Yates at the University of Leicester.

Study shows stronger brain activity after writing on paper than on tablet or smartphone

A study of Japanese university students and recent graduates has revealed that writing on physical paper can lead to more brain activity when remembering the information an hour later. Researchers say that the complex, spatial and tactile information associated with writing by hand on physical paper is likely what leads to improved memory.

Study predicts the oceans will start emitting ozone-depleting CFCs

The world's oceans are a vast repository for gases including ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs. They absorb these gases from the atmosphere and draw them down to the deep, where they can remain sequestered for centuries and more.

Lab one step closer to understanding how life started on Earth

How did life begin on Earth and could it exist elsewhere? Researchers at Simon Fraser University have isolated a genetic clue—an enzyme known as an RNA polymerase—that provides new insights about the origins of life. The research is published today in the journal Science.

Discovery identifies non-DNA mechanism involved in transmitting paternal experience to offspring

It has long been understood that a parent's DNA is the principal determinant of health and disease in offspring. Yet inheritance via DNA is only part of the story; a father's lifestyle such as diet, being overweight and stress levels have been linked to health consequences for his offspring. This occurs through the epigenome—heritable biochemical marks associated with the DNA and proteins that bind it. But how the information is transmitted at fertilization along with the exact mechanisms and molecules in sperm that are involved in this process has been unclear until now.

Study finds evidence of 55 new chemicals in people

Scientists at UC San Francisco have detected 109 chemicals in a study of pregnant women, including 55 chemicals never before reported in people and 42 "mystery chemicals," whose sources and uses are unknown.

Researchers find evidence of elusive Odderon particle

For 50 years, the research community has been hunting unsuccessfully for the so-called Odderon particle. Now, a Swedish-Hungarian research group has discovered the mythical particle with the help of extensive analysis of experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland.

As endangered birds lose their songs, they can't find mates

Male songbirds usually learn their tunes from adult mentors. But when aspiring crooners lack proper role models, they hit all the wrong notes—and have less success attracting mates.

Whispers from the dark side: What can gravitational waves reveal about dark matter?

The NANOGrav Collaboration recently captured the first signs of very low-frequency gravitational waves. Prof. Pedro Schwaller and Wolfram Ratzinger analyzed the data and, in particular, considered the possibility of whether this may point towards new physics beyond the Standard Model. In an article published in the journal SciPost Physics, they report that the signal is consistent with both a phase transition in the early universe and the presence of a field of extremely light axion-like particles (ALPs). The latter are considered as promising candidates for dark matter.

Researchers reveal the extent to which rivers across the country are losing flow to aquifers

Water is an ephemeral thing. It can emerge from an isolated spring, as if by magic, to birth a babbling brook. It can also course through a mighty river, seeping into the soil until all that remains downstream is a shady arroyo, the nearby trees offering the only hint of where the water has gone.

Bullies, thieves and chiefs: The hidden cost of psychopaths at work

From psychological thrillers to true crime stories, people who depart from social norms can be deeply fascinating. Psychopaths most of all.

With SpaceX partnership, ISS enters its 'Golden Age'—but what comes next?

After 20 years of continuous habitation, the International Space Station has entered its "Golden Age" and is abuzz with activity—thanks in large part to the return of US rocket launches via commercial partner SpaceX.

New study shows microplastics turn into 'hubs' for pathogens, antibiotic-resistant bacteria

It's estimated that an average-sized wastewater treatment plant serving roughly 400,000 residents will discharge up to 2,000,000 microplastic particles into the environment each day. Yet, researchers are still learning the environmental and human health impact of these ultra-fine plastic particles, less than 5 millimeters in length, found in everything from cosmetics, toothpaste and clothing microfibers, to our food, air and drinking water.


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Science X Newsletter Sunday, Mar 21

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for March 21, 2021:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Icelandic volcano subsiding after first eruption in 900 years

How Finland embraced being 'world's happiest nation'

Large asteroid to (safely) zip past Earth

UK gamers and politicians take aim at console 'scalpers'

Carbon pawprint: is man's best friend the planet's enemy?

Record rains, flooding prompt evacuations in Australia

Iceland's main volcanic eruptions

An easy way to reduce socioeconomic disparities

UK vaccine drive 'huge success' after jabbing half of all adults

Japan lifts tsunami advisory after strong quake off northeast

'Hunger hormone' ghrelin affects monetary decision making

Eruption of Iceland volcano easing, not affecting flights

Meteor streaks over Cuba, causes explosion

Musk tells China data gathered by Teslas remain secret: report

Semaglutide reduces excess body fat in people with obesity

Astronomy and Space news

Large asteroid to (safely) zip past Earth

The largest asteroid to pass by Earth this year will swing closest on Sunday, giving astronomers a rare chance for a good look at a space rock that formed at the dawn of our solar system.

Meteor streaks over Cuba, causes explosion

What is believed to be a meteor lit the sky over eastern Cuba and caused an explosion, scientists on the island said Saturday. There were no reports of damage or injury.

Swiss kids suit up for 'Mission to Mars'

Leo pulls on a shiny, silver suit and places the helmet gingerly over his head before marching with the other budding astronauts towards their spaceship.

Technology news

UK gamers and politicians take aim at console 'scalpers'

Furious British gamers and lawmakers are training their sights on "scalpers" who are buying up coveted PS5 and Xbox consoles and selling them online at vastly inflated prices.

Musk tells China data gathered by Teslas remain secret: report

Tesla boss Elon Musk strongly denied Saturday that his cars, which gather large amounts of data, could ever be used to spy on China despite fears raised by Beijing, the Wall Street Journal reported.

With friendly rivalries, eSports gain traction in corporate world

Microsoft software engineer Daniel Jost has found a way to take on his peers at Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google in friendly fashion—through video game competition.

Twitter to establish legal entity in Turkey, comply with law

Twitter has announced it will establish a legal entity in Turkey in order to continue operating in the country, which passed a controversial social media law last year.

Volkswagen suspends production in Brazil over COVID

Volkswagen said Friday it was suspending production at its four plants in Brazil for 12 days because of a new surge of COVID-19 in the hard-hit country.

China crackdown cuts Big Tech down to size

Tighter regulations, billions in lost overseas share value and government pledges to get even tougher—Chinese tech giants are reeling under what looks like a sustained Big Brother assault on innovation and enterprise.


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