Science X Newsletter Week 20

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 20:

Scientists break the link between a quantum material's spin and orbital states

In designing electronic devices, scientists look for ways to manipulate and control three basic properties of electrons: their charge; their spin states, which give rise to magnetism; and the shapes of the fuzzy clouds they form around the nuclei of atoms, which are known as orbitals.

Bizarre new species discovered... on Twitter

While many of us use social media to be tickled silly by cat videos or wowed by delectable cakes, others use them to discover new species. Included in the latter group are researchers from the University of Copenhagen's Natural History Museum of Denmark. Indeed, they just found a new type of parasitic fungus via Twitter.

A combo of fasting plus vitamin C is effective for hard-to-treat cancers, study shows

Scientists from USC and the IFOM Cancer Institute in Milan have found that a fasting-mimicking diet could be more effective at treating some types of cancer when combined with vitamin C.

Vitamin D determines severity in COVID-19 so government advice needs to change

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin are calling on the government in Ireland to change recommendations for vitamin D supplements

An inmate's love for math leads to new discoveries

There are many examples of mathematical breakthroughs achieved in prison. Maybe the most famous is from the French mathematician Andre Weil, who came up with his hugely influential conjectures while in a military prison in Rouen, France. Another mathematical giant, Srinivasan Ramanujan, started off with no formal training in mathematics and produced most of his revolutionary results in complete isolation.

A possible explanation for the Earth's North magnetic pole moving toward Russia

A trio of researchers, two with the University of Leeds, the other the Technical University of Denmark, has developed a theory to explain why Earth's north magnetic pole has been drifting from Canada to Russia. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Philip Livermore, Christopher Finlay and Matthew Bayliff describe their theory and what their models based on it showed.

Dozens of prehistoric, Roman and medieval sites discovered by archaeology volunteers working at home during lockdown

Dozens of previously unrecorded Roman, prehistoric and medieval sites have been discovered by archaeology volunteers based at home during the coronavirus lockdown.

Modern sea-level rise linked to human activities, Rutgers research reaffirms

New research by Rutgers scientists reaffirms that modern sea-level rise is linked to human activities and not to changes in Earth's orbit.

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants

Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows.

Change of direction in immune defense: Frankincense reprograms inflammatory enzyme

A research team from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany) and Louisiana State University has clarified the molecular mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory effect of a natural product from frankincense resin. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase plays a key role, reprogramming the normally pro-inflammatory enzyme into an anti-inflammatory protein.

Time travel into the future is totally possible

Believe it or not, time travel is possible.

Scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors

Once unimaginable, transistors consisting only of several-atom clusters or even single atoms promise to become the building blocks of a new generation of computers with unparalleled memory and processing power. But to realize the full potential of these tiny transistors—miniature electrical on-off switches—researchers must find a way to make many copies of these notoriously difficult-to-fabricate components.

Experimental two-in-one shot may give diabetics a better way to control their blood sugar

A Stanford research team has developed a way to boost the effectiveness of the insulin injections people with diabetes routinely take to control their blood sugar.

Scientists successfully develop 'heat resistant' coral to fight bleaching

The team included researchers from CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the University of Melbourne.

Strange hollow ball-like structures found in 80-million-year-old fossils

Scientists from The University of Western Australian and University of Cambridge have made a chance discovery in UK museum collections, finding hollow ball-like structures in 80-million-year-old fossils from species believed to be related to starfish and sea urchins.

A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally

There is ongoing debate among policymakers and the general public about where SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, came from. While researchers consider bats the most likely natural hosts for SARS-CoV-2, the origins of the virus are still unclear. On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that is SARS-CoV-2's closest relative in some regions of the genome and which contains insertions of amino acids at the junction of the S1 and S2 subunits of the virus's spike protein in a manner similar to SAR-CoV-2. While it's not a direct evolutionary precursor of SARS-CoV-2, this new virus, RmYN02, suggests that these types of seemingly unusual insertion events can occur naturally in coronavirus evolution, the researchers say.

Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history

Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Prof. Fu Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

What fluid dynamics can explain about COVID-19 spread—and how to protect yourself

Public health advice for avoiding respiratory illness is largely unchanged since the Spanish flu of 1918, one of history's deadliest pandemics. Keep a safe distance from other people. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water to kill any germs you may have picked up. Cover your nose and mouth with a face mask—even one fashioned from a bandana will do. Such guidance is based on the understanding that respiratory infections spread through virus-carrying droplets that are expelled when infected people cough, sneeze, or breathe.

Imaging reveals bowel abnormalities in patients with COVID-19

Patients with COVID-19 can have bowel abnormalities, including ischemia, according to a new study published today in the journal Radiology.

Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?

Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating—revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga