Science X Newsletter Week 02

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 02:

Biologists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.

New evidence shows that the key assumption made in the discovery of dark energy is in error

The most direct and strongest evidence for the accelerating universe with dark energy is provided by the distance measurements using type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) for the galaxies at high redshift. This result is based on the assumption that the corrected luminosity of SN Ia through the empirical standardization would not evolve with redshift.

Hubble detects smallest known dark matter clumps

When searching for dark matter, astronomers must go on a sort of "ghost hunt." That's because dark matter is an invisible substance that cannot be seen directly. Yet it makes up the bulk of the universe's mass and forms the scaffolding upon which galaxies are built. Dark matter is the gravitational "glue" that holds galaxies as well as galaxy clusters together. Astronomers can detect its presence indirectly by measuring how its gravity affects stars and galaxies.

Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike.

The Milky Way's impending galactic collision is already birthing new stars

The outskirts of the Milky Way are home to the galaxy's oldest stars. But astronomers have spotted something unexpected in this celestial retirement community: a flock of young stars.

Copper-based nanomaterials can kill cancer cells in mice

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from KU Leuven, the University of Bremen, the Leibniz Institute of Materials Engineering, and the University of Ioannina has succeeded in killing tumour cells in mice using nano-sized copper compounds together with immunotherapy. After the therapy, the cancer did not return.

Australia bushfires spark 'unprecedented' climate disinformation

Australia's bushfire emergency has sparked an online disinformation campaign "unprecedented" in the country's history, researchers told AFP Friday, with bots deployed to shift blame for the blazes away from climate change.

Chemists report a new use for the waste product of nuclear power generation

Chemists have found a new use for the waste product of nuclear power—transforming an unused and stockpile into a versatile compound which could be used to create valuable commodity chemicals as well as new energy sources.

Music evokes 13 key emotions. Scientists have mapped them

The "Star-Spangled Banner" stirs pride. Ed Sheeran's "The Shape of You" sparks joy. And "ooh là là!" best sums up the seductive power of George Michael's "Careless Whispers."

An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic

ETH researchers have created an incredibly lightweight 18-carat gold, using a matrix of plastic in place of metallic alloy elements.

Gold bar found in Mexico was Aztec treasure: study

A gold bar found in a Mexico City park in 1981 was part of the Aztec treasure looted by Hernan Cortes and the Spanish conquistadors 500 years ago, a new study says.

Always counterclockwise: Puzzle of early Neolithic house orientations finally solved

Human behaviour is influenced by many things, most of which remain unconscious to us. One of these is a phenomenon known among perception psychologists as "pseudo-neglect." This refers to the observation that healthy people prefer their left visual field to their right, and therefore divide a line regularly left of centre.

Famous black hole has jet pushing cosmic speed limit

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration released the first image of a black hole with observations of the massive, dark object at the center of Messier 87, or M87, last April. This black hole has a mass of about 6.5 billion times that of the sun and is located about 55 million light years from Earth. The black hole has been called M87* by astronomers and has recently been given the Hawaiian name of "Powehi."

Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge

Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8 - 1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimised cutting tools, according to a new study by University of Kent and UCL.

Geographers find tipping point in deforestation

University of Cincinnati geography researchers have identified a tipping point for deforestation that leads to rapid forest loss.

Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization

Could the division of labor in an anthill be driven by the same social dynamics governing the gap between liberals and conservatives? That was the surprising question tackled by Princeton biologists Chris Tokita and Corina Tarnita.

Study: Human body temperature has decreased in the US since the 19th century

Since the 19th century, the average human body temperature in the United States has dropped, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

$1 increase in minimum wage linked to 3.5-6% fall in suicide rate

A US$1 increase in the minimum wage is linked to a fall in the suicide rate of between 3.5 and 6% among people with high school education or less, reveals a 26-year study, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Cystic fibrosis carriers are at increased risk for cystic fibrosis-related conditions

Conventional wisdom says that having just one mutated copy of the cystic fibrosis gene has no effects on a person's health—the disease occurs when both copies of the gene are mutated. But a new study from the University of Iowa suggests that may not be the case.

In a nearby galaxy, a fast radio burst unravels more questions than answers

For more than a decade, astronomers across the globe have wrestled with the perplexities of fast radio bursts—intense, unexplained cosmic flashes of energy, light years away, that pop for mere milliseconds.


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