Long-distance quantum information exchange—success at the nanoscale





Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute cooled a chip containing a large array of spin qubits below -273 Celsius.  To manipulate individual electrons within the quantum-dot array, they applied fast voltage pulses to metallic gate electrodes located on the surface of the gallium-arsenide crystal (see scanning electron micrograph). Because each electron also carries a quantum spin, this allows quantum information processing based on the array’s spin states (the arrows on the graphic illustration). During the mediated spin exchange, which only took a billionth of a second, two correlated electron pairs were coherently superposed and entangled over five quantum dots, constituting a new world record within the community. Credit: Niels Bohr Institute

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-03-long-distance-quantum-exchangesuccess-nanoscale.html#jCp


Aliens Might Shoot Lasers at Black Holes to Travel the Galaxy

https://www.livescience.com/65005-black-hole-halo-drive-laser.html



An astronomer at Columbia University has a new guess about how hypothetical alien civilizations might be invisibly navigating our galaxy: Firing lasers at binary black holes (twin black holes that orbit each other).
The idea is a futuristic upgrade of a technique NASA has used for decades.
Right now, spacecraft already navigate our solar system using gravity wells as slingshots. The spacecraft itself enters orbit around a planet, flings itself as close as possible to a planet or moon to pick up speed, and then uses that added energy to travel even faster toward its next destination. In doing so, it saps away a tiny fraction of the planet's momentum through space — though the effect is so minimal it's pretty much impossible to notice. [9 Strange, Scientific Reasons We Haven't Found Aliens Yet]

How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Science

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How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Science

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