Science X Newsletter Week 31

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 31:

Lake Huron sinkhole surprise: The rise of oxygen on early Earth linked to changing planetary rotation rate

The rise of oxygen levels early in Earth's history paved the way for the spectacular diversity of animal life. But for decades, scientists have struggled to explain the factors that controlled this gradual and stepwise process, which unfolded over nearly 2 billion years.

Researchers find oxygen spike coincided with ancient global extinction

Two hundred fifty-two million years ago, much of life on planet Earth was dying.

After 60 years, scientists find the missing link in our body's blood pressure control

University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have determined the location of natural blood-pressure barometers inside our bodies that have eluded scientists for more than 60 years.

V404 Cygni: Huge rings around a black hole

This image features a spectacular set of rings around a black hole, captured using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. The X-ray images of the giant rings reveal information about dust located in our galaxy, using a similar principle to the X-rays performed in doctor's offices and airports.

Study confirms ancient Spanish cave art was made by Neanderthals

Neanderthals, long perceived to have been unsophisticated and brutish, really did paint stalagmites in a Spanish cave more than 60,000 years ago, according to a study published on Monday.

Study shows common insecticide is harmful in any amount

A new UC Riverside study shows that a type of insecticide made for commercial plant nurseries is harmful to a typical bee even when applied well below the label rate.

Why is this weird, metallic star hurtling out of the Milky Way?

About 2,000 light-years away from Earth, there is a star catapulting toward the edge of the Milky Way. This particular star, known as LP 40−365, is one of a unique breed of fast-moving stars—remnant pieces of massive white dwarf stars—that have survived in chunks after a gigantic stellar explosion.

Licensed drug could reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection by up to 70 per cent, reveals study

A licensed drug normally used to treat abnormal levels of fatty substances in the blood could reduce infection caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus by up to 70 percent, reveals a study in the laboratory by an international collaboration of researchers.

Astronomers detect new large sub-Neptune alien world

Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite (TESS), an international team of astronomers has detected a new sub-Neptune exoplanet orbiting an M dwarf star. The newly found extrasolar world, designated TOI-2406 b, is nearly three times larger than the Earth. The discovery is reported in a paper published July 29 on arXiv.org.

'Vultur' malware uses new technique to steal banking credentials

A team of researchers at the security firm ThreatFabric is reporting on their website blog page that they have found instances of a new kind of malware in Android apps downloaded from Google Play that attempt to steal banking login information. They have named the new malware Vultur, after the birds that prey on wounded or dead targets.

Mathematician reveals world's oldest example of applied geometry

A UNSW mathematician has revealed the origins of applied geometry on a 3700-year-old clay tablet that has been hiding in plain sight in a museum in Istanbul for over a century.

A promising new treatment for COVID-19 infection

A flowering plant native to North Africa and Western Asia could be utilized in the future treatment of COVID-19 infection.

Massive ancient lake across prairies emptied quickly enough to set off an ice age, study suggests

A flood of epic proportions drained at a rate of more than 800 Olympic swimming pools per second from a glacial lake that spanned the Prairie provinces more than 12,000 years ago, according to a University of Alberta-led study.

Giant bird-eating centipedes exist—and they're surprisingly important for their ecosystem

Giant bird-eating centipedes may sound like something out of a science-fiction film—but they're not. On tiny Phillip Island, part of the South Pacific's Norfolk Island group, the Phillip Island centipede (Cormocephalus coynei) population can kill and eat up to 3,700 seabird chicks each year.

In blistering drought, California farmers rip up precious almond trees

Crushed by a devastating drought and new water restrictions, Daniel Hartwig had no choice but to pull thousands of precious, fragrant almond trees from his California farm.

New material offers ecofriendly solution to converting waste heat into energy

Perseverance, NASA's 2020 Mars rover, is powered by something very desirable here on Earth: a thermoelectric device, which converts heat to useful electricity.

Researchers are first in the world to watch plants 'drink' water in real-time

The inability to monitor water uptake inside roots—without damaging the specimen—has been a key stumbling block for researchers seeking to understand the motion of fluids in living plant cells and tissues.

Lunar samples solve mystery of the moon's supposed magnetic shield

In 2024, a new age of space exploration will begin when NASA sends astronauts to the moon as part of their Artemis mission, a follow-up to the Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s.

Using graphene foam to filter toxins from drinking water

Some kinds of water pollution, such as algal blooms and plastics that foul rivers, lakes, and marine environments, lie in plain sight. But other contaminants are not so readily apparent, which makes their impact potentially more dangerous. Among these invisible substances is uranium. Leaching into water resources from mining operations, nuclear waste sites, or from natural subterranean deposits, the element can now be found flowing out of taps worldwide.

A COVID-19 biomarker: Low blood levels of sphingosine predict symptomatic infections

Researchers remain perplexed as to why some patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, remain asymptomatic while other patients develop severe disease symptoms. This question is once again at the front of mind as the Delta variant spreads across the country. In a new retrospective study, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) discovered a specific and sensitive biomarker in blood samples that predicts which patients will develop COVID-19 symptoms. Their results, published online on July 9 in Scientific Reports, show that reduced levels of a specific lipid, sphingosine, are significantly associated with developing COVID-19 symptoms. Conversely, elevated levels of sphingosine, as well as a protein involved in its production, acid ceramidase (AC), are associated with asymptomatic infections.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga