Science X Newsletter Sunday, May 9

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for May 9, 2021:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

3D printing company Desktop Metal will now use wood to print

Ingenuity Mars helicopter completes first one-way trip

Archaeologists discover remains of 9 Neanderthals near Rome

Large Chinese rocket segment disintegrates over Indian Ocean

String of satellites baffles residents, bugs astronomers

Vegetarians have healthier levels of disease markers than meat-eaters

Largest study to date confirms non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications do not result in worse COVID-19 outcomes

Mild COVID-19 infection is very unlikely to cause lasting heart damage

In fight against COVID variants some firms target T cell jabs

Chinese rocket to tumble back to Earth in uncontrolled re-entry

EXPLAINER: How activists target CDC vaccine tracking system

California agency approves warehouse rule for air quality

Last wild macaw in Rio is lonely and looking for love

EU agrees potential 1.8 billion-dose purchase of Pfizer jab

Major US pipeline halts operations after ransomware attack

Astronomy and Space news

Ingenuity Mars helicopter completes first one-way trip

NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter completed its fifth flight on the Red Planet today with its first one-way journey from Wright Brothers Field to an airfield 423 feet (129 meters) to the south. After arrival above its new airfield, Ingenuity climbed to an altitude record of 33 feet (10 meters) and captured high-resolution color images of its new neighborhood before touching down.

Large Chinese rocket segment disintegrates over Indian Ocean

A large segment of a Chinese rocket re-entered the Earth's atmosphere and disintegrated over the Indian Ocean on Sunday, China's space agency said, following fevered speculation over where the 18-tonne object would come down.

String of satellites baffles residents, bugs astronomers

A string of lights that lobbed across the night sky in parts of the U.S. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday had some people wondering if a fleet of UFOs was coming, but it had others— mostly amateur stargazers and professional astronomers— lamenting the industrialization of space.

Chinese rocket to tumble back to Earth in uncontrolled re-entry

A large segment of a Chinese rocket is expected to make an uncontrolled re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere over the weekend, but Beijing has downplayed fears of damage on the ground and said the risk is very low.

Technology news

3D printing company Desktop Metal will now use wood to print

The 3D printing company Desktop Metal has just announced the release of Forust, a new tool using wood to 3D print objects. The company, founded in 2019, focuses on 3D printing for interior design. With printing methods deemed "non-destructive", they haven't come under much scrutiny for safety or environmental concerns, making them an attractive prospect for acquisition.

Major US pipeline halts operations after ransomware attack

The operator of a major pipeline system that transports fuel across the East Coast said Saturday it had been victimized by a ransomware attack and had halted all pipeline operations to deal with the threat. The attack is unlikely to affect gasoline supply and prices unless it leads to a prolonged shutdown of the pipeline, experts said.

Cyberattack on US pipeline is linked to criminal gang

The cyberextortion attempt that has forced the shutdown of a vital U.S. pipeline was carried out by a criminal gang known as DarkSide that cultivates a Robin Hood image of stealing from corporations and giving a cut to charity, a person close to the investigation said Sunday.

Facebook winning war on COVID vaccine lies, hoaxes and conspiracies. Twitter and TikTok? Not so much, report says

The nation's leading social media companies pledged to put warning labels on COVID-19 and COVID vaccines posts to stop the spread of falsehoods, conspiracy theories and hoaxes that are fueling vaccine hesitancy in the U.S..

Online speech shield under fire as Trump Facebook ban stays

Lurking beneath Facebook's decision on whether to continue Donald Trump's suspension from its platform is a far more complex and consequential question: Do the protections carved out for companies when the internet was in its infancy 25 years ago make sense when some of them have become global powerhouses with almost unlimited reach?


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