Science X Newsletter Week 41

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 41:

A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests that reality does not depend on the person measuring it

Quantum mechanics arose in the 1920s, and since then scientists have disagreed on how best to interpret it. Many interpretations, including the Copenhagen interpretation presented by Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, and in particular, von Neumann-Wigner interpretation, state that the consciousness of the person conducting the test affects its result. On the other hand, Karl Popper and Albert Einstein thought that an objective reality exists. Erwin Schrödinger put forward the famous thought experiment involving the fate of an unfortunate cat that aimed to describe the imperfections of quantum mechanics.

Some planets may be better for life than Earth

Earth is not necessarily the best planet in the universe. Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own. Some of these orbit stars that may be better than even our sun.

Scientists find upper limit for the speed of sound

A research collaboration between Queen Mary University of London, the University of Cambridge and the Institute for High Pressure Physics in Troitsk has discovered the fastest possible speed of sound.

US Nobel winner's 25-year odyssey to black hole at center of galaxy

For US astronomer Andrea Ghez, who won this year's Nobel Physics Prize, what makes black holes so fascinating is how tricky they are to conceptualize.

New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity

An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth. This work, which verifies one of the predictions of Einstein's General Relativity, is to be published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Mind and space bending physics on a convenient chip

Thanks to Einstein, we know that our three-dimensional space is warped and curved. And in curved space, normal ideas of geometry and straight lines break down, creating a chance to explore an unfamiliar landscape governed by new rules. But studying how physics plays out in a curved space is challenging: Just like in real estate, location is everything.

Earth grows fine gems in minutes

Rome wasn't built in a day, but some of Earth's finest gemstones were, according to new research from Rice University.

Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat

A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have purr-fected the art of building a bond with cats.

New study rebuts 75-year-old belief in reptile evolution

Challenging a 75-year-old notion about how and when reptiles evolved during the past 300 million-plus years involves a lot of camerawork, loads of CT scanning, and, most of all, thousands of miles of travel. Just check the stamps in Tiago R. Simões ' passport.

Vitamin D deficiency increased risk of COVID in healthcare workers, new study shows

Healthcare workers who self-isolated after developing symptoms of COVID-19 were more likely to have a vitamin D deficiency, with workers from Black, Asian or ethnic minority backgrounds particularly affected, a new study by experts at the University of Birmingham has found.

Remote control of blood sugar: Electromagnetic fields treat diabetes in animal models

Researchers from the University of Iowa may have discovered a safe new way to manage blood sugar non-invasively. Exposing diabetic mice to a combination of static electric and magnetic fields for a few hours per day normalizes two major hallmarks of type 2 diabetes, according to new findings published Oct. 6 in Cell Metabolism.

3 scientists win Nobel physics prize for black hole research

Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for establishing the all-too-weird reality of black holes—the straight-out-of-science-fiction cosmic monsters that suck up light and time and will eventually swallow us, too.

Nobel winning women hope to inspire a new generation of scientists

On hearing that they had been awarded a Nobel Chemistry Prize for their groundbreaking work on gene-editing Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier said they hoped it would inspire a new generation of women in science.

Forearm artery reveals humans evolving from changes in natural selection

Humans haven't developed genetic mutations for telepathy or superpowers just yet, but a new study shows our species is still evolving in unique ways and changes in the natural selection could be the major reason.

Carbon creation finding set to rock astrophysics

A new measurement of how quickly stars create carbon may trigger a major shift in our understanding of how stars evolve and die, how the elements are created, and even the origin and abundance of the building blocks of life.

Researchers solve 100-year-old metallurgy puzzle

To solve a 100-year puzzle in metallurgy about why single crystals show staged hardening while others don't, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists took it down to the atomistic level.

New quantum computing algorithm skips past time limits imposed by decoherence

A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations.

Scientists solve 90-year-old geometry problem

Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists and mathematicians have resolved the last, stubborn piece of Keller's conjecture, a geometry problem that scientists have puzzled over for 90 years.

Do cloth masks work? Only if you machine wash them after use

A new publication from researchers at UNSW Sydney advises daily washing of cloth masks to reduce the likelihood of contamination and transmission of viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

Looking for pieces of Venus? Try the moon

A growing body of research suggests the planet Venus may have had an Earth-like environment billions of years ago, with water and a thin atmosphere.


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