Science X Newsletter Thursday, Dec 31

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for December 31, 2020:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Light-responsive E. coli functional biofilms as scaffolds for hydroxyapatite mineralization

Controlling the nanoscale structure of membranes is key for clean water, researchers find

Published data from Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial show 94.1 percent efficacy

Brain damage of patients with Covid-19

Well-preserved Ice Age woolly rhino found in Siberia

New virtual screening strategy identifies existing drug that inhibits Covid-19 virus

New mutations in malaria parasite encourage resistance against key preventive drug

Multiple mosquito blood meals accelerate malaria transmission

Spontaneous robot dances highlight a new kind of order in active matter

Stretching diamond for next-generation microelectronics

Blood vessel cells implicated in chronic inflammation of obesity

Apple patents keyboard with dynamically changing key functions

Higher red cell transfusion threshold offers no advantage for treating preterm infants

How did trauma centers respond to COVID-19? New processes provide care to trauma patients while keeping providers safe

Moving due to unaffordable housing may jeopardize healthcare

Technology news

Spontaneous robot dances highlight a new kind of order in active matter

Predicting when and how collections of particles, robots, or animals become orderly remains a challenge across science and engineering.

Apple patents keyboard with dynamically changing key functions

Apple may be preparing to reinvent the keyboard.

Amazon to buy hit podcast producer Wondery

Amazon said Wednesday it signed a deal to acquire the hit podcast production firm Wondery, in a move which boosts the US tech giant's efforts to round out its offerings from its music platform.

Facebook to close Irish units at center of tax dispute

Facebook confirmed Wednesday it was closing its Irish subsidiaries at the center of a dispute on profit shifting to avoid taxes in the United States.

Robots with rhythm: Boston Dynamics' dancing androids a hit

These robots have rhythm.

The tech refugees bringing Tesla software chops to every car

It's about the software, silly. For all of Tesla's battery wizardry, the company's equally impressive coup has been creating a vehicle that can be updated and improved from afar as easily as a smartphone. And while other automakers are finally making long-range electric vehicles, Tesla has a considerable head start in crafting a computer-like car.

With Sezzle now worth more than $1 billion, CEO describes a year on a rocket ship

During the Black Friday to Cyber Monday weekend two years ago, about 8,000 people for the first time used Sezzle Inc.'s payment system when they shopped online.

Startup Volcon joins Austin area's electric vehicle scene, plans new HQ

The Austin area's electric-powered vehicle sector continues to power up, as Volcon – a startup focused on off-road electric vehicles – is planning a new headquarters a manufacturing site in Central Texas.

They were experts in viruses, and now in pitfalls of fame

Dr. Ashish Jha started 2020 thousands of miles from home, taking a sabbatical in Europe from his academic post at Harvard. Then the coronavirus pandemic arrived in the U.S.

Indonesia in $9.8 bln electric vehicle battery deal with Korea's LG

Indonesia said Wednesday it had signed a $9.8 billion electric vehicle battery deal with South Korea's LG as it moves to become a global production hub for the green technology.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga

Science X Newsletter Wednesday, Dec 30

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for December 30, 2020:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Designing Dirac vortex topological photonic crystal fibres

Organic meats found to have approximately the same greenhouse impact as regular meats

Observations shed more light on the atmosphere of white dwarf GD 424

ATLAS project finds 12 new species of sea creatures

Torpor: a neat survival trick once thought rare in Australian animals is actually widespread

Fish sex organs boosted under high CO2

Potential new prescription strategy for stroke discovered

Researchers prepare tailored and wearable sensor via 3-D printed UV-curable sacrificial mold

Scientists further improve accuracy of directional polarimetric camera

The map of nuclear deformation takes the form of a mountain landscape

Unique susceptibility to unique Sars-CoV-2 variants and vaccines

Novel public-private partnership facilitates development of fusion energy

Largest study of Asia's rivers unearths 800 years of paleoclimate patterns

AI-controlled vertical farms promise revolution in food production

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety

Physics news

Designing Dirac vortex topological photonic crystal fibres

Optical fibres made of topological photonic crystals allow improved versatility and control across the modes and polarization of light they transmit. Compositionally, photonic crystals contain bandgaps to prevent the passage of light relative to specific wave energies and momenta much like an on/off switch. In a new report now published on Nature Light: Science & Applications, Hao Lin, and Ling Lu at the Institute of Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences transmitted pure "single mode" light across a large frequency range via a topological feature known as a "Dirac vortex." The concept can lead to applications that transmit light signals more stably across long distances. While the work is theoretical at present, the researchers suggest the use of fibers made from silica based on stack-and-draw methods or three-dimensional (3-D) printing technologies to fabricate and test these theoretical concepts.

Scientists further improve accuracy of directional polarimetric camera

Recently, researchers from the Optical Remote Sensing Center of the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (AIOFM), Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) have successfully improved the accuracy of directional polarimetric camera (DPC) laboratory polarization calibration via new methods.

The map of nuclear deformation takes the form of a mountain landscape

Until recently, scientists believed that only very massive nuclei could have excited zero-spin states of increased stability with a significantly deformed shape. Meanwhile, an international team of researchers from Romania, France, Italy, the USA and Poland showed in their latest article that such states also exist in much lighter nickel nuclei. Positive verification of the theoretical model used in these experiments allows describing the properties of nuclei unavailable in Earth laboratories.

Astronomy and Space news

Observations shed more light on the atmosphere of white dwarf GD 424

Astronomers have performed spectroscopic observations of a newly detected white dwarf star known as GD 424. Results of the observational campaign provide more insights into the atmosphere of this object. The study was presented in a paper published December 23 on arXiv.org.

Technology news

Researchers prepare tailored and wearable sensor via 3-D printed UV-curable sacrificial mold

Three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques have the ability to fabricate wearable sensors with customized and complex designs compared with conventional processes. The vat photopolymerization 3-D printing technique exhibits better printing resolution, faster printing speed, and is capable of fabricating a refined structure. Due to the lack of highly conductive photocurable resins, it is difficult to prepare sensors through vat photopolymerization 3-D printing technique.

Novel public-private partnership facilitates development of fusion energy

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is collaborating with private industry on cutting-edge fusion research aimed at achieving commercial fusion energy. This work, enabled through a public-private DOE grant program, supports efforts to develop high-performance fusion grade plasmas. In one such project PPPL is working in coordination with MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) and Commonwealth Fusion Systems, a start-up spun out of MIT that is developing a tokamak fusion device called "SPARC."

AI-controlled vertical farms promise revolution in food production

When you think about it, early civilizations had a rough time when it came to dinnertime. With no supermarkets, McDonald's, or Cheesecake Factories, you pretty much had to find and prepare your own meal every day. And since Uber would not be invented for another 14,000 years, primitive peoples around 12,000 BC had to walk, sometimes for miles, and learn to hunt, fish, gather and cook for their daily meals. In the rain. Even on Sundays.

Apple loses copyright suit against security startup

A federal judge Tuesday dismissed Apple's copyright infringement lawsuit against cybersecurity startup Corellium in a case which could have implications for researchers who find software bugs and vulnerabilities.

Major rail safety technology installed before deadline

The railroad industry has installed an automatic braking system on nearly 58,000 miles of track where it is required ahead of a yearend deadline, federal regulators said Tuesday.

The Sunburst hack was massive and devastating – 5 observations from a cybersecurity expert

So much remains unknown about what is now being called the Sunburst hack, the cyberattack against U.S. government agencies and corporations. U.S. officials widely believe that Russian state-sponsored hackers are responsible.

Grid or solar: looking for the best energy solution for the rural poor

South Asia has made tremendous progress in connecting rural areas to the electricity grid but the number of people in Africa without access has scarcely changed since 2010. More than a half-billion people in Africa don't have access to electricity, meaning the continent hosts 72% of the world's non-electrified population. The UN Sustainable Development Goals have set a universal goal of ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. To achieve this, the continent will require a big electrification push.

Why Amazon, Apple, Peloton and Zoom won 2020, while others like Quibi lost big

When a pandemic hits, stay-at-home orders are issued and people are spending even less time at retail stores, e-commerce giant Amazon was there to serve.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga

Science X Newsletter Tuesday, Dec 29

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for December 29, 2020:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Metasurface enabled quantum edge detection

New supercluster discovered by astronomers

The two sides of inflammation—the cure and the curse

Japanese pairing looking into using wood to build satellites

Using economic data to create predictive models of anticipated antimicrobial resistance levels across countries

Order and disorder in crystalline ice explained

Is forearm curvature in the 'Little Foot' Australopithecus natural or pathological?

Quadriplegic patient uses brain signals to feed himself with two advanced prosthetic arms

New AI tool can predict in seconds what a movie will be rated

Switching DNA functions on and off with light

Study shows children who self-identify as sexual or gender minority more likely to be obese than peers

A single gene 'invented' hemoglobin several times

Electrons hop to it on twisted molecular wires

Researchers publish review article on the physics of interacting particles

Flag leaves could help top off photosynthetic performance in rice

Physics news

Metasurface enabled quantum edge detection

Metasurfaces provide unique platforms to realize exotic phenomena including negative refraction, achromatic focusing, and electromagnetic cloaking due to the engineered dielectric or metallic architectures. The intersection of metasurfaces and quantum optics can lead to significant opportunities that remain to be explored. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Junxiao Zhou, Shikai Liu and a research team in quantum information, nano-optoelectronic devices and computer engineering in China and the U.S. proposed and demonstrated a polarization-entangled photon source. They used the source to switch the optical edge mode in an imaging system to ON or OFF states based on a highly dielectric metasurface. The experiment enriched the fields of quantum optics and metamaterials as a promising direction toward quantum edge detection and image processing with a remarkable signal-to-noise ratio.

Order and disorder in crystalline ice explained

A fascinating substance with unique properties, ice has intrigued humans since time immemorial. Unlike most other materials, ice at very low temperature is not as ordered as it could be. A collaboration between the Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), the Institute of Physics Rosario (IFIR-UNR), with the support of the Istituto Officina dei Materiali of the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IOM), made new theoretical inroads on the reasons why this happens and on the way in which some of the missing order can be recovered. In that ordered state the team of scientists have described a relatively obscure and yet fundamental property of very low temperature ice: ferroelectricity. The results, published in PNAS, are likely to extend to ice surfaces, a possibility that could be relevant to the agglomeration of ice particles in interstellar space.

Researchers publish review article on the physics of interacting particles

Scientific articles in the field of physics are mostly very short and deal with a very restricted topic. A remarkable exception to this is an article published recently by physicists from the Universities of Münster and Düsseldorf. The article is 127 pages long, cites a total of 1075 sources and deals with a wide range of branches of physics—from biophysics to quantum mechanics.

Researchers achieve sustained, high-fidelity quantum teleportation

A viable quantum internet—a network in which information stored in qubits is shared over long distances through entanglement—would transform the fields of data storage, precision sensing and computing, ushering in a new era of communication.

Astronomy and Space news

New supercluster discovered by astronomers

By analyzing the data from the eROSITA Final Equatorial Depth Survey (eFEDS), an international team of astronomers has detected a new supercluster. The newly found structure consists of eight galaxy clusters. The discovery is reported in a paper published December 21 on the arXiv pre-print server.

To help trudge through the snow, the chang'e-5 recovery team wore powered exoskeletons

Other worlds aren't the only difficult terrain personnel will have to traverse in humanity's exploration of the solar system. There are some parts of our own planet that are inhospitable and hard to travel over. Inner Mongolia, a northern province of China, would certainly classify as one of those areas, especially in winter. But that's exactly the terrain team members from the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASTC) had to traverse on December 16th to retrieve lunar samples from the Chang'e-5 mission. What was even more unique is that they did it with the help of exoskeletons.

Technology news

Japanese pairing looking into using wood to build satellites

Japanese company Sumitomo Forestry has announced a joint development project with Kyoto University to test the idea of using wood as a component in satellite construction. As part of the announcement, officials with Sumitomo Forestry told reporters that work on the project will begin with experiments designed to test different types of wood in extreme environments.

New AI tool can predict in seconds what a movie will be rated

Movie ratings can determine a movie's appeal to consumers and the size of its potential audience. Thus, they have an impact on a film's bottom line. Typically, humans do the tedious task of manually rating a movie based on viewing the movie and making decisions on the presence of violence, drug abuse and sexual content.

What's the best way to boost the economy? Invest in high-voltage transmission lines

When, in the midst of the pandemic, the Economic Society of Australia invited 150 of Australia's keenest young thinkers to come up with "brief, specific and actionable" proposals to improve the economy, amid scores of ideas about improving job matching, changing the tax system, providing non-repayable loans to businesses and accelerating telehealth, two proposals stood out.

Football: 'The wall' can make it harder to save free kicks – new research

In football, free kicks occur when the referee believes a rule has been broken. If central enough and within 30 metres from the goal, the attacking team typically attempts a direct shot on goal. However, the goalkeeper routinely places a "wall" of defensive players in between the ball and the goal to complicate the kicker's task of shooting on target.

How coronavirus made 2020 the year of the electric bike

Walking and cycling gained a higher profile than ever in 2020 as a result of the pandemic. Governments around the world encouraged individuals to go on foot or take their bikes where possible instead of using crowded public transport, and invested in widescale cycling infrastructure to help them do so.

Wind powers more than half of UK electricity for first time

Wind power accounted for more than half of Britain's daily generated electricity on Saturday in the wake of Storm Bella, according to energy giant Drax.

Boeing 737 MAX to return to US skies with American flight

American Airlines passengers are set to fly Tuesday on the first US commercial flight on a Boeing 737 MAX since the aircraft was allowed to return to service after a nearly two-year absence.

Army research leads to more effective training model for robots

Multi-domain operations, the Army's future operating concept, requires autonomous agents with learning components to operate alongside the warfighter. New Army research reduces the unpredictability of current training reinforcement learning policies so that they are more practically applicable to physical systems, especially ground robots.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga

Science X Newsletter Monday, Dec 28

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for December 28, 2020:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Searching for invisible axion dark matter with a new multiple-cell cavity haloscope

The evolution of single amyloid fibrils into microcrystals

Gut cells sound the alarm when parasites invade

Best of Last Week: Planetary conjunction, accelerating vehicle research and COVID-19 infection leads to lasting immunity

Periodic and phase-locked modulation in the pulsar PSR B1929+10 investigated with FAST

Quantum philosophy: Four ways physics will challenge your reality

Mallard to go? Dig of Pompeii fast-food place reveals tastes

Ripples in space-time could provide clues to missing components of the universe

Discovery boosts theory that life on Earth arose from RNA-DNA mix

Chemists and collaborators develop a new drug discovery strategy for "undruggable" drug targets

New studies suggest vaping could cloud your thoughts

Faster, greener way of producing carbon spheres

Big bumblebees learn locations of best flowers

New quantum nanodevice can simultaneously act as a heat engine and a refrigerator

Chinese astronomers discover 591 high-velocity stars with LAMOST and Gaia

Physics news

Searching for invisible axion dark matter with a new multiple-cell cavity haloscope

Over the past few decades, many experimental physicists have been probing the existence of particles called axions, which would result from a specific mechanism that they think could explain the contradiction between theories and experiments describing a fundamental symmetry. This symmetry is associated with a matter-antimatter imbalance in the Universe, reflected in interactions between different particles.

Quantum philosophy: Four ways physics will challenge your reality

Imagine opening the weekend paper and looking through the puzzle pages for the Sudoku. You spend your morning working through this logic puzzle, only to realise by the last few squares there's no consistent way to finish it.

New quantum nanodevice can simultaneously act as a heat engine and a refrigerator

A multitasking nanomachine that can act as a heat engine and a refrigerator at the same time has been created by RIKEN engineers. The device is one of the first to test how quantum effects, which govern the behavior of particles on the smallest scale, might one day be exploited to enhance the performance of nanotechnologies.

Important milestone in the creation of a quantum computer

Quantum computer: One of the obstacles for progress in the quest for a working quantum computer has been that the working devices that go into a quantum computer and perform the actual calculations, the qubits, have hitherto been made by universities and in small numbers. But in recent years, a pan-European collaboration, in partnership with French microelectronics leader CEA-Leti, has been exploring everyday transistors—that are present in billions in all our mobile phones—for their use as qubits. The French company Leti makes giant wafers full of devices, and, after measuring, researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have found these industrially produced devices to be suitable as a qubit platform capable of moving to the second dimension, a significant step for a working quantum computer. The result is now published in Nature Communications.

Astronomy and Space news

Periodic and phase-locked modulation in the pulsar PSR B1929+10 investigated with FAST

Using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), astronomers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and elsewhere have conducted single-pulse observations of a pulsar known as PSR B1929+10. Results of the monitoring campaign shed more light on the periodic and phase-locked modulation in this source. The study was presented in a paper published December 18 on arXiv.org.

Ripples in space-time could provide clues to missing components of the universe

There's something a little off about our theory of the universe. Almost everything fits, but there's a fly in the cosmic ointment, a particle of sand in the infinite sandwich. Some scientists think the culprit might be gravity—and that subtle ripples in the fabric of space-time could help us find the missing piece.

Chinese astronomers discover 591 high-velocity stars with LAMOST and Gaia

A research team, led by astronomers from National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), has discovered 591 high velocity stars based on data from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) and Gaia, and 43 of them can even escape from the Galaxy.

Primordial black holes and the search for dark matter from the multiverse

The Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) is home to many interdisciplinary projects which benefit from the synergy of a wide range of expertise available at the institute. One such project is the study of black holes that could have formed in the early universe, before stars and galaxies were born.

Technology news

Japan unveils green growth plan for 2050 carbon neutral goal

Japan on Friday unveiled plans to boost renewable energy, phase out gasoline-powered cars and reduce battery costs as part of a bid to reach an ambitious 2050 carbon-neutral goal.

GoDaddy apologises for fake Christmas bonus email security test

US web company GoDaddy apologized Thursday after an email that promised employees a Christmas bonus in the midst of the economic crisis turned out to be a computer security test.

China orders Ant Group to rectify businesses

Chinese regulators have ordered Ant Group, the world's largest financial technology company, to rectify its businesses and comply with regulatory requirements amid increased scrutiny of anti-monopoly practices in the country's internet sector.

iPhone again best tech seller of the year, thanks to work-from-home trend

Once again, the best-selling tech product of 2020 was Apple's iPhone—topping the phone's sales in 2019—despite being a pandemic year when so many people were thrown out of work and money was harder to come by.

Extremely energy efficient microprocessor developed using superconductors

Researchers from Yokohama National University in Japan have developed a prototype microprocessor using superconductor devices that are about 80 times more energy efficient than the state-of-the-art semiconductor devices found in the microprocessors of today's high-performance computing systems.

China orders Ant Group to return to online payment roots

Chinese fintech giant Ant Group has been ordered by regulators to drastically change its business model and return to its roots as a payment services provider, as the state squeeze continues on the once unbridled empire of tech tycoon Jack Ma.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga

Science X Newsletter Week 52

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 52:

Korean artificial sun sets the new world record of 20-sec-long operation at 100 million degrees

The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), a superconducting fusion device also known as the Korean artificial sun, set the new world record as it succeeded in maintaining the high temperature plasma for 20 seconds with an ion temperature over 100 million degrees (Celsius).

Artificial intelligence solves Schrödinger's equation

A team of scientists at Freie Universität Berlin has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) method for calculating the ground state of the Schrödinger equation in quantum chemistry. The goal of quantum chemistry is to predict chemical and physical properties of molecules based solely on the arrangement of their atoms in space, avoiding the need for resource-intensive and time-consuming laboratory experiments. In principle, this can be achieved by solving the Schrödinger equation, but in practice this is extremely difficult.

The world's oldest story? Astronomers say global myths about 'seven sisters' stars may reach back 100,000 years

In the northern sky in December is a beautiful cluster of stars known as the Pleiades, or the "seven sisters." Look carefully and you will probably count six stars. So why do we say there are seven of them?

Japanese spacecraft's gifts: Asteroid chips like charcoal

They resemble small fragments of charcoal, but the soil samples collected from an asteroid and returned to Earth by a Japanese spacecraft were hardly disappointing.

Jupiter and Saturn cheek-to-cheek in rare celestial dance

The solar system's two biggest planets, Jupiter and Saturn, came within planetary kissing range in Monday's evening sky, an intimacy that will not occur again until 2080.

Earthlings and astronauts chat away, via ham radio

The International Space Station cost more than $100 billion. A ham radio set can be had for a few hundred bucks.

Masks block 99.9% of large COVID-linked droplets: study

Face masks reduce the risk of spreading large COVID-linked droplets when speaking or coughing by up to 99.9 percent, according to a lab experiment with mechanical mannequins and human subjects, researchers said Wednesday.

Breast milk could help treat COVID-19 and protect babies

Health psychology professor Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook and incoming grad student Jessica Marino have a new study suggesting that the breastmilk of mothers who have recovered from COVID-19 contains strong antibodies to the virus.

Experiment takes 'snapshots' of light, stops light, uses light to change properties of matter

Light travels at a speed of about 300,000,000 meters per second as light particles, photons, or equivalently as electromagnetic field waves. Experiments led by Hrvoje Petek, an R.K. Mellon professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy examined ideas surrounding the origins of light, taking snapshots of light, stopping light and using it to change properties of matter.

New flower from 100 million years ago brings fresh holiday beauty to 2020

Oregon State University researchers have identified a spectacular new genus and species of flower from the mid-Cretaceous period, a male specimen whose sunburst-like reach for the heavens was frozen in time by Burmese amber.

New nanomaterial helps obtain hydrogen from a liquid energy carrier, in a key step toward a stable and clean fuel source

Hydrogen is a sustainable source of clean energy that avoids toxic emissions and can add value to multiple sectors in the economy including transportation, power generation, metals manufacturing, among others. Technologies for storing and transporting hydrogen bridge the gap between sustainable energy production and fuel use, and therefore are an essential component of a viable hydrogen economy. But traditional means of storage and transportation are expensive and susceptible to contamination. As a result, researchers are searching for alternative techniques that are reliable, low-cost and simple. More-efficient hydrogen delivery systems would benefit many applications such as stationary power, portable power, and mobile vehicle industries.

Could COVID-19 have wiped out the Neandertals?

Everybody loves Neandertals, those big-brained brutes we supposedly outcompeted and ultimately replaced using our sharp tongues and quick, delicate minds. But did we really, though? Is it mathematically possible that we could yet be them, and they us?

Austrian court overturns virus mask mandate in schools

Austria's Constitutional Court ruled Wednesday that two government measures to fight the spread of coronavirus in schools, compulsory mask-wearing and splitting classes into two halves to be taught in alternate shifts, were illegal.

Making jet fuel out of carbon dioxide

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. and one in Saudi Arabia has developed a way to produce jet fuel using carbon dioxide as a main ingredient. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their process and its efficiency.

Remarkable new species of snake found hidden in a biodiversity collection

To be fair, the newly described Waray Dwarf Burrowing Snake (Levitonius mirus) is pretty great at hiding.

Study finds evidence of lasting immunity after mild or asymptomatic COVID-19 infection

New research involving scientists from Queen Mary University of London has found evidence of protective immunity in people up to four months after mild or asymptomatic COVID-19.

Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life

A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are.

New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean

An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.

Anti-diarrhea drug drives cancer cells to cell death

The research group led by Dr. Sjoerd van Wijk from the Institute of Experimental Cancer Research in Paediatrics at Goethe University already two years ago found evidence indicating that the anti-diarrhea drug loperamide could be used to induce cell death in glioblastoma cell lines. They have now deciphered its mechanism of action and, in doing so, are opening new avenues for the development of novel treatment strategies.

COVID immunity lasts at least eight months, new data reveals

Australian researchers have revealed—for the first time—that people who have been infected with the COVID-19 virus have immune memory to protect against reinfection for at least eight months.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you do not wish to receive such emails in the future, please unsubscribe here.
You are subscribed as phys.org@quicklydone.com. You may manage your subscription options from your Science X profile

ga