Science X Newsletter Week 12

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 12:

'Sushi parasites' have increased 283-fold in past 40 years

The next time you eat sashimi, nigiri or other forms of raw fish, consider doing a quick check for worms.

One of Darwin's evolution theories finally proved by Cambridge researcher

Scientists have proved one of Charles Darwin's theories of evolution for the first time—nearly 140 years after his death.

Scientists have discovered the origins of the building blocks of life

Rutgers researchers have discovered the origins of the protein structures responsible for metabolism: simple molecules that powered early life on Earth and serve as chemical signals that NASA could use to search for life on other planets.

Scientists create quantum sensor that covers entire radio frequency spectrum

A quantum sensor could give Soldiers a way to detect communication signals over the entire radio frequency spectrum, from 0 to 100 GHz, said researchers from the Army.

Research team discovers path to razor-sharp black hole images

Last April, the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) sparked international excitement when it unveiled the first image of a black hole. Today, a team of researchers have published new calculations that predict a striking and intricate substructure within black hole images from extreme gravitational light bending.

Ancient fish fossil reveals evolutionary origin of the human hand

An ancient Elpistostege fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins.

Evolution selects for 'loners' that hang back from collective behavior—at least in slime molds

It isn't easy being a loner—someone who resists the pull of the crowd, who marches to their own drummer.

The COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic has a natural origin, scientists say

The novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that emerged in the city of Wuhan, China, last year and has since caused a large scale COVID-19 epidemic and spread to more than 70 other countries is the product of natural evolution, according to findings published today in the journal Nature Medicine.

Geologists find lost fragment of ancient continent in Canada's North

Sifting through diamond exploration samples from Baffin Island, Canadian scientists have identified a new remnant of the North Atlantic craton—an ancient part of Earth's continental crust.

Curiosity Mars rover takes a new selfie before record climb

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover recently set a record for the steepest terrain it's ever climbed, cresting the "Greenheugh Pediment," a broad sheet of rock that sits atop a hill. And before doing that, the rover took a selfie, capturing the scene just below Greenheugh.

Mathematicians develop new theory to explain real-world randomness

Brownian motion describes the random movement of particles in fluids, however, this revolutionary model only works when a fluid is static, or at equilibrium.

SpaceX plans first manned flight to space station in May

Elon Musk's SpaceX will send astronauts to the International Space Station for the first time in May, NASA said, announcing the first crewed launch from the United States to the platform since 2011.

New coronavirus stable for hours on surfaces: study

The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces, according to a new study from National Institutes of Health, CDC, UCLA and Princeton University scientists The New England Journal of Medicine. The scientists found that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. The results provide key information about the stability of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19 disease, and suggests that people may acquire the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. The study information was widely shared during the past two weeks after the researchers placed the contents on a preprint server to quickly share their data with colleagues.

Urban coyotes eat lots of cats—and human garbage, study of their poop reveals

A study that "dissected" 3,100 pieces of coyote poop discovered domestic cats are a big part of what urban coyotes eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner, according to the National Park Service.

Dead Sea Scroll fragments in The Museum of the Bible found to be fake

A team of workers at Art Fraud Insights, LLC, has found that all of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS) fragments housed at the Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. are fake. They have published their findings on their company website.

Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of mammoths reveal clues about Ice Age

Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of dozens of mammoths have revealed clues about how ancient communities survived Europe's ice age.

Ancient mantis-man petroglyph discovered in Iran

A unique rock carving found in the Teymareh rock art site (Khomein county) in Central Iran with six limbs has been described as part man, part mantis. Rock carvings, or petroglyphs, of invertebrate animals are rare, so entomologists teamed up with archaeologists to try and identify the motif. They compared the carving with others around the world and with the local six-legged creatures which its prehistoric artists could have encountered.

Masks, gloves don't stop coronavirus spread: experts

Wearing masks and gloves as a precaution against coronavirus is ineffective, unnecessary for the vast majority of people, and may even spread infections faster, experts said Tuesday.

Chandra data tests 'theory of everything'

One of the biggest ideas in physics is the possibility that all known forces, particles, and interactions can be connected in one framework. String theory is arguably the best-known proposal for a "theory of everything" that would tie together our understanding of the physical universe.

Kids get mild COVID-19 symptoms, but chance of transmission high: study

A new Chinese study of coronavirus infection in kids could bring comfort to American parents—and highlight the wisdom of at least temporarily closing schools.


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