Science X Newsletter Friday, Jan 31

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Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for January 31, 2020:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Investigating dynamics of democratic elections using physics theory

Discovery takes pressure off blood measurements

Study provides first look at sperm microbiome using RNA sequencing

Robotic submarine snaps first-ever images at foundation of notorious Antarctic glacier

Got slime? Using regenerative biology to restore mucus production

Researchers identify possible new combination treatment for advanced melanoma

A projector had far too much fun with car tech

Could resetting our internal clocks help control diabetes?

A quantum of solid: A glass nanoparticle in the quantum regime

More countries publishing ecosystem accounts, considering environment in economic decisions

How the immune system becomes blind to cancer cells

First view of hydrogen at the metal-to-metal hydride interface

Nonflammable electrolyte for high-performance potassium batteries

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope ends mission of astronomical discovery

New light shed on neuronal circuits involved in behavior, learning and dysfunction

Physics news

Investigating dynamics of democratic elections using physics theory

Sometimes, physics theories and constructs can also be used to study seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as social behaviors or dynamics. While human beings are not necessarily similar to specific physical particles, theories or techniques that physicists typically use to analyze behavioral patterns in atoms or electrons may aid the general understanding of large-scale social behaviors as long as these behaviors do not depend on small-scale details. Based on this idea, some researchers have started using physics theories to investigate social behaviors that take place during democratic elections.

A quantum of solid: A glass nanoparticle in the quantum regime

Researchers in Austria have used lasers to levitate and cool a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime. Although it is trapped in a room-temperature environment, the particle's motion is solely governed by the laws of quantum physics. The team of scientists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) published their new study in the journal Science.

How supercomputers are helping us link quantum entanglement to cold coffee

Theoretical physicists from Trinity College Dublin have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics—quantum entanglement—and thermalisation, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists at Washington University in St. Louis have proposed a way to use data from ultra-high energy neutrinos to study interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics. The 'Zee burst' model leverages new data from large neutrino telescopes such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica and its future extensions.

Exploring strangeness and the primordial Universe

Physicists believe that in the Universe's first ten microseconds free quarks and gluons filled all of spacetime, forming a new phase of matter named 'quark-gluon plasma' (QGP). Experimental and theoretical work at CERN was instrumental in the discovery of this hot soup of primordial matter, which is recreated today in accelerator-based lab experiments. To discover QGP in such experiments, the observation of exotic 'strange' quarks is very important. If QGP is created, strangeness is readily produced through collisions between gluons. In analysis published in EPJ ST, Dr. Johann Rafelski from The University of Arizona, United States, also working at CERN, presents how our understanding of this characteristic strangeness production signature has evolved over the span of his long career.

Calculating Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole

A RUDN University physicist has developed a formula for calculating Hawking radiation on the event horizon of a black hole, which allows physicists to determine how this radiation would be changed with quantum corrections to Einstein's theory of gravity. This formula will allow researchers to test the accuracy of different versions of the quantum gravity theory by observing black holes, and comprises a step toward the long-sought "grand unification theory" that would connect quantum mechanics and relativity. The article is published in the journal Physical Review D.

Astronomy & Space news

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope ends mission of astronomical discovery

After more than 16 years studying the universe in infrared light, revealing new wonders in our solar system, our galaxy and beyond, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope's mission has come to an end.

Warp factor: We've observed a spinning star that drags the fabric of space and time

One of the predictions of Einstein's general theory of relativity is that any spinning body drags the very fabric of space-time in its vicinity around with it. This is known as "frame-dragging."

Space station's cosmic detector working after 4 spacewalks

The cosmic detector that required a series of difficult spacewalking repairs is back in action.

Your brain on Mars: How scientists will track astronauts' mental performance on missions

A journey to Mars is not going to be easy and there are a number of problems that need to be solved before we go. One interesting problem is how do we monitor the astronauts themselves. Of course, it is easy to monitor their heart rate and blood pressure, but is it possible to monitor what is going on inside their heads?

Making simulated cosmic dust—in the microwave

Cosmic dust is the key to the chemical evolution of stars, planets, and life itself, but its composition is not well understood, and we can't currently collect samples for analysis. A few examples have arrived on Earth as interplanetary dust particles and comet dust, in meteorites, but their complicated history means they may not be representative.

Image: Hubble spies bar, baby stars

The galaxy depicted in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is a barred spiral known as NGC 7541, in the constellation of Pisces (the Fishes). 

From Antarctica to space: Telemedicine at the limit

ESA is working with Argentina to test telemedicine device Tempus Pro in the harsh conditions of Antarctica as Europe prepares for its next phase of human exploration in space.

Technology news

Discovery takes pressure off blood measurements

Researchers at Monash University are on the verge of creating a revolutionary, portable blood pressure monitoring device that can provide data continuously to patients from the comfort of their home.

A projector had far too much fun with car tech

Stop it. You can fool a Tesla Autopilot system with a projector?

Study gets up close with near-death experiences

Those who momentarily shuffled off this mortal coil returned with positive perceptions of what they discovered on the other side—a finding that encourages researchers to dig deeper into the ways people describe near-death experiences, according to a joint study between Western and the University of Li├Ęge (Belgium).

Ginni Rometty, 1st female CEO at IBM, to step down in April

Ginni Rometty, the first female CEO in IBM's century-long history, is leaving the helm in April.

Atari plans to open video game-themed resorts in 8 US cities

Atari, the arcade game company that ushered in the gaming revolution in the 1980s, is opening eight video game-themed hotels across the United States, including ones in Las Vegas and Phoenix.

Amazon's latest milestone: 150 million Prime members

Amazon had another prime holiday season.

Nintendo says no new Switch in 2020

Japanese gaming giant Nintendo said Friday there would be no fresh model of its hot-selling Switch console this year, dashing the hopes of fans eager for a new version.

Autonomous vehicles could benefit health if cars are electric and shared

What impact will self-driving cars have on public health? The Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has taken part in a study that analyzed the potential risks and benefits of autonomous vehicles for public health. The conclusions of the study, published in the Annual Review of Public Health, indicate that this new type of mobility could benefit public health if the cars are electric and the model used is based on ride sharing.

Amazon's Jeff Bezos, already the wealthiest person on the planet, just got billions richer

Jeff Bezos, the world's richest person, got billions richer in minutes Thursday as Amazon shares soared in extended trading on news of a killer quarter driven by strong holiday sales.

The 49ers will win the Super Bowl, Alexa predicts, but Siri and Google Assistant won't say

The San Francisco 49ers are going to win the Super Bowl. That's what Amazon Alexa says anyway.

Coronavirus outbreak: Social media platforms scramble to contain misinformation

Hoaxes about the coronavirus are spreading as fast, if not faster, than the actual virus on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, and the social media platforms are scrambling to contain the global outbreak.

Researchers look at novel methods to enhance battery performance

Researchers at Penn State are looking at innovative ways to improve energy storage in an effort to better utilize renewable energy technologies.

As cities grow, the Internet of Things can help us get on top of the waste crisis

Total global waste is expected to double from nearly 2 billion tonnes in 2016 to an estimated 4 billion tonnes by 2050 as consumer-oriented urban populations grow. As population growth increases consumption and waste, managing this waste is becoming an ever greater challenge. The Internet of Things (IoT) can be used to develop smarter and more effective ways of managing and reducing waste.

Attacking the clones: Dual techniques help reveal malicious image editing

It is relatively easy to clone parts of an image with photo editing software to remove objects and backgrounds or even to duplicate objects. A skillful digital artist will be able to do this almost seamlessly. Such artists with malicious intent can use cloning tools and to fake and forge images and detecting such distortions of the originals can be difficult even to those trained in the art themselves.

iPhone and Android users are getting 117 new emoji in 2020

New year. New emoji.

For $10 fee, startup offers unlimited calls and texts

A San Francisco startup may have the solution parents have been seeking for years. Free phone service—without an expensive monthly contract.

The most human algorithm

It is now possible to predict who the best candidate for receiving an organ transplant is, know whether clients of a bank will return the loans they request, choose the films that best coincide with the interests of consumers, or even select someone's ideal partner. Mathematical algorithms constantly analyse millions of items of data, identify patterns and make predictions about all areas of life. But in most cases, the results give little more than a closed prediction that cannot be interpreted and which is often affected by biases in the original data.

Facebook fights spread of misinformation about virus online

Facebook says it's working to limit the spread of misinformation and potentially harmful content about the coronavirus as bogus claims about the ongoing outbreak circulate online.

Amazon highlights taxes paid in pushback against critics

Amazon said Friday it paid more than $1 billion in US federal income taxes in 2019 as it pushed back at criticism over its corporate responsibility.

Waymo: Self-driving vehicle in manual mode at time of crash

A Waymo self-driving minivan operating in manual mode was involved in a rear-end collision in a Phoenix suburb caused by a sedan's reckless driving, the company said Friday.

Apple takes smartphone sales crown from Samsung

Apple was the top smartphone seller in the final quarter of last year, seizing the crown from Samsung, according to market trackers.

Amazon is big ... really, really big; workforce hits 500K

Need more proof that Amazon is big? It came this week.

Online ads still vulnerable to manipulation in US election

Older men in Arkansas might see a close-up photo of President Donald Trump pumping his fist in the air, along with a message asking them to donate $30 to his campaign for a Super Bowl commercial.

Twitter, Pinterest crack down on voter misinformation

Twitter and Pinterest are taking new steps to root out voting misinformation designed to suppress participation in the November elections.

China's factory activity falls in January as virus fears grow

China's manufacturing activity slipped in January, official data released Friday showed, as the country grapples with a new virus that has claimed more than 200 lives.

Facebook agrees to $550 million settlement in facial recognition class action lawsuit

Facebook has agreed to pay $550 million to settle a class-action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology in Illinois.

ViacomCBS names NBC exec to head CBS

ViacomCBS has named George Cheeks as president and CEO of CBS Entertainment group starting March 23.


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