Science X Newsletter Week 47

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 47:

Earth's magnetic song recorded for the first time during a solar storm

Data from ESA's Cluster mission has provided a recording of the eerie "song" that Earth sings when it is hit by a solar storm.

First detection of sugars in meteorites gives clues to origin of life

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/goddard/2019/sugars-in-meteorites

When stuck in water, bees create a wave and hydrofoil atop it, study finds

Walking on Caltech's campus, research engineer Chris Roh (MS '13, Ph.D. '17) happened to see a bee stuck in the water of Millikan Pond. Although it was a common-enough sight, it led Roh and his advisor, Mory Gharib (Ph.D. '83), to a discovery about the potentially unique way that bees navigate the interface between water and air.

Fossil dig leads to unexpected discovery of 91-million-year-old shark new to science

A 91-million-year-old fossil shark newly named Cretodus houghtonorum discovered in Kansas joins a list of large dinosaur-era animals. Preserved in sediments deposited in an ancient ocean called the Western Interior Seaway that covered the middle of North America during the Late Cretaceous period (144 million to 66 million years ago), Cretodus houghtonorum was an impressive shark estimated to be nearly 17 feet or slightly more than 5 meters long based on a new study appearing in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

An artificial intelligence algorithm can learn the laws of quantum mechanics

Artificial intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials.

Borderline personality disorder has strongest link to childhood trauma

People with borderline personality disorder are 13 times more likely to report childhood trauma than people without any mental health problems, according to University of Manchester research.

New hybrid device can both capture and store solar energy

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.

Omega-3 fish oil as effective for attention as ADHD drugs for some children

Researchers from King's College London and China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan, have found omega-3 fish oil supplements improve attention among children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but only among those with low levels of omega-3 in their blood.

Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars

A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the center of the Milky Way galaxy. The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.

First global geologic map of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, completed

The first map showing the global geology of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has been completed and fully reveals a dynamic world of dunes, lakes, plains, craters and other terrains.

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

A team of scientists from Scripps Research and Stanford University has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of ribosomes—the complex and evolutionarily ancient "molecular machines" that make proteins in cells and are essential for all life forms.

Infants from 2100 years ago found with helmets made of children's skulls

A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Universidad TĂ©cnica de ManabĂ­ in Ecuador has found and reported on ancient infant skulls that were excavated at a site in Salango, Ecuador. In their paper published in the journal Latin American Antiquity, the group describes how the infant skulls were encased in the skulls of older children.

Only eat oysters in months with an 'r'? Rule of thumb is at least 4,000 years old

Foodie tradition dictates only eating wild oysters in months with the letter "r"—from September to April—to avoid watery shellfish, or worse, a nasty bout of food poisoning. Now, a new study suggests people have been following this practice for at least 4,000 years.

El Nino swings more violently in the industrial age, compelling hard evidence says

El Ninos have become more intense in the industrial age, which stands to worsen storms, drought, and coral bleaching in El Nino years. A new study has found compelling evidence in the Pacific Ocean that the stronger El Ninos are part of a climate pattern that is new and strange.

New, slippery toilet coating provides cleaner flushing, saves water

Every day, more than 141 billion liters of water are used solely to flush toilets. With millions of global citizens experiencing water scarcity, what if that amount could be reduced by 50%?

Quantum computers learn to mark their own work

A new test to check if a quantum computer is giving correct answers to questions beyond the scope of traditional computing could help the first quantum computer that can outperform a classical computer to be realized.

New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs

New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles.

Scientists discover body's protection shield

Scientists have discovered a way to manipulate the body's own immune response to boost tissue repair. The findings, published in Current Biology today, reveal a new network of protective factors to shield cells against damage. This discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers, could significantly benefit patients undergoing surgery by speeding recovery times and lowering the risk of complication.

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on Earth, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia.

Husbands' stress increases if wives earn more than 40 per cent of household income: study

Husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40% of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point and are most stressed when they are entirely economically dependent on their partner, new research from the University of Bath shows.


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