Science X Newsletter Week 45

Dear ymilog,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 45:

Voyager 2 reaches interstellar space: Scientists detect plasma density jump

Voyager 1 has a companion in the realm of the stars.

Huge trove of mammoth skeletons found in Mexico

Archaeologists said Wednesday they have made the largest-ever discovery of mammoth remains: a trove of 800 bones from at least 14 of the extinct giants found in central Mexico.

Researchers claim data from Planck space observatory suggests universe is a sphere

A trio of researchers with the University of Manchester, Universit√† di Roma 'La Sapienza' and Sorbonne Universities has sparked a major debate among cosmologists by claiming that data from the Planck space observatory suggests the universe is a sphere—not flat, as current conventional theory suggests. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Eleonora Di Valentino, Alessandro Melchiorri and Joseph Silk outline their arguments and suggest their findings indicate that there exists a cosmological crisis that must be addressed.

Bioengineers develop quick, saliva-based detection test for marijuana

Dr. Shalini Prasad (front), interim department head of bioengineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, holds the THC biosensor her team developed. In back, from left, are electrical engineering Ph.D. student Devangsingh Sankhala, research engineer Paul Rice and biomedical engineering Ph.D. student Vikram Narayanan Dhamu.

A new way to measure gravity: Using floating atoms

A team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, has found a new way to measure gravity—by noting differences in atoms in a supposition state, suspended in the air by lasers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their new technique and explain why they believe it will be more useful than traditional methods.

New measurement yields smaller proton radius

Using the first new method in half a century for measuring the size of the proton via electron scattering, the PRad collaboration has produced a new value for the proton's radius in an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

Stave churches in Norway older than previously believed

What's the real age of Norwegian stave churches?

Scientists link Neanderthal extinction to human diseases

Growing up in Israel, Gili Greenbaum would give tours of local caves once inhabited by Neanderthals and wonder along with others why our distant cousins abruptly disappeared about 40,000 years ago. Now a scientist at Stanford, Greenbaum thinks he has an answer.

Implantable artificial kidney achieves preclinical milestone

The Kidney Project, a national effort to develop an implantable bio-artificial kidney that could eliminate the need for dialysis, will announce a key milestone in a November 7, 2019 presentation at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week 2019 conference in Washington, DC.

Newly discovered motifs in rock art in Tumlehed shows seafaring in the Stone Age

South-west Sweden's best preserved rock painting has now been dated—it is from the late Stone Age. With the aid of new technologies, researchers at the University of Gothenburg have been able to reveal a number of previously unknown motifs that are no longer visible to the naked eye. The most important of these newly discovered motifs are boats with elk-head stems. This is the first time that these kinds of boats have been documented in southern or western Scandinavia and these motifs provide further evidence of the long-distance sea voyages undertaken by Stone Age maritime hunters.

Scientists take strides towards entirely renewable energy

Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have taken a giant stride towards solving a riddle that would provide the world with entirely renewable, clean energy from which water would be the only waste product.

Spiders and ants inspire metal that won't sink

University of Rochester researchers, inspired by diving bell spiders and rafts of fire ants, have created a metallic structure that is so water repellent, it refuses to sink—no matter how often it is forced into water or how much it is damaged or punctured.

Scientists develop industrial-strength adhesive which can be unstuck in magnetic field

Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a glue which can unstick when placed in a magnetic field, meaning products otherwise destined for landfill, could now be dismantled and recycled at the end of their life.

Chemists observe 'spooky' quantum tunneling

A molecule of ammonia, NH3, typically exists as an umbrella shape, with three hydrogen atoms fanned out in a nonplanar arrangement around a central nitrogen atom. This umbrella structure is very stable and would normally be expected to require a large amount of energy to be inverted.

The most spectacular celestial vision you'll never see

Contrary to previous thought, a gigantic planet in wild orbit does not preclude the presence of an Earth-like planet in the same solar system—or life on that planet.

Any amount of running linked to significantly lower risk of death

Any amount of running is linked to a significantly lower risk of death from any cause, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

A third of California methane traced to a few super-emitters

NASA scientists are helping California create a detailed, statewide inventory of methane point sources—highly concentrated methane releases from single sources—using a specialized airborne sensor. The new data, published this week in the journal Nature, can be used to target actions to reduce emissions of this potent greenhouse gas.

Kratom may cause liver damage: study

(HealthDay)—The popular herbal supplement kratom may cause liver damage, researchers warn.

Mercury putting on rare show Monday, parading across the sun

Mercury is putting on a rare celestial show next week, parading across the sun in view of most of the world.

Doctors try CRISPR gene editing for cancer, a 1st in the US

The first attempt in the United States to use a gene editing tool called CRISPR against cancer seems safe in the three patients who have had it so far, but it's too soon to know if it will improve survival, doctors reported Wednesday.


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